Celebrating Michigan’s Wilderness on World Rewilding Day

Today, March 20th, Michiganders across the state are celebrating the start of spring. We, too, look forward to all that this season brings including wildflowers, bird migration, and more. But today, we are especially excited about World Rewilding Day—established in 2021, World Rewilding Day raises awareness of the need for large, ‘wild’ habitat in the fight against climate change-driven extinctions.

An aerial photograph showing the Ottawa National Forest. Photo by Jason Whalen | Fauna Creative

Our recently-released video “Keep the U.P. Wild” explores one such effort in Michigan’s Upper Peninsula. The Keep the U.P. Wild Coalition last year began a campaign to add federal Wilderness designation to more than 40,000 acres of land in the western U.P., and has since grown to include more than 300 organizations.

Designation requires congressional action, which would provide the highest level of federal land protection for the four areas within the one-million-acre Ottawa National Forest in the western Upper Peninsula: The Trap Hills, Ehlco Area, Norwich Plains, and Sturgeon River Gorge Wilderness Addition.

If successful, wilderness designation would protect these areas for biological diversity, not resource extraction, while still providing opportunities for their respectful use, enjoyment, and economic benefit.

 “The scientific community has learned … that connections and scale really play an important role in the ability of many species to exist over time,” said MNA Conservation Director, Andrew Bacon. Wilderness designation at this scale would most certainly benefit the flora and fauna and provide for the natural processes that help reduce the effects of carbon in the atmosphere—one of the leading drivers of climate change.

Watch our video today, and learn more about this campaign and the coalition members at keeptheupwild.com.

Winter’s Tiny Surprises

For many of us, winter in Michigan is known for the calm feeling that snow brings. If you’ve ever spent time in a forest during winter, you know how quiet it can feel. Just a few birds chirping and the trees creaking as they sway in the wind.

But there is much more happening in the snow than meets the eye. In addition to mammals whose footprints you may see bounding through the snow—like rabbits, mice, and squirrels—there are also several much smaller species that you may be surprised to learn, thrive in winter as well.

Snow fleas

No, not the kind that will happily hitch a ride and live on your pets. Snow fleas are actually more closely related to crustaceans but, according to the Farmer’s Almanac, are so-called because of the visual similarity and ability to jump long distances respective to their size much like fleas.

Snow fleas—or “springtails” if you prefer—are an essential part of their ecosystem, helping to create healthy topsoil as they feed on decaying organic matter like leaves. Though snow fleas are active throughout the year, they are much easier to spot in winter as tiny bluish-black dots starkly contrasted against the white snow, especially on warmer days as the snow begins to melt.

Snow fleas gather in a boot print in the snow. Photo by Robb Johnston.

Snow mosquitoes

If you love the cooler months for the lack of blood-sucking insects, you may be disappointed to learn that there is a special species of mosquito active in the winter months. But unlike the mosquitoes we typically see in the summer that feed on humans and animals, the males of the winter species get their sustenance from juices extracted from plants. Their eggs are then laid in pools of melting snow, and the larvae feed on algae as they mature.

(Left) A mosquito on spotted coralroot plant in summer, photo by Gary Hofing. (Right) Snow mosquito, photo by Lauren Ross.

Stoneflies

The larvae of stoneflies live deep in the cool water of rivers and streams, where oxygen is abundant. In the winter months when most other aquatic insects are absent and the surfaces of these bodies of water cool the stonefly is able to reach maturity, mating and laying their eggs over the course of approximately two weeks. As spring turns to summer and the surface water warms again, the hatched ‘nymphs’ enter a hibernation period which keeps them safe from predation so that they can mature when winter returns.

Nature in Michigan is full of life in all seasons. So although it may get quiet and harder to see when the snow falls, there is still much to be seen if you look closely enough. So leave the bug repellents at home and head out to an MNA Nature Sanctuary near you to explore all that Michigan nature has to offer this winter!

Protecting Wild Nature on Giving Tuesday

by Lauren Ross, MNA Communications & Events Coordinator

One of my favorite ways to experience nature is to stand on the shore of Lake Superior in a winter storm, the gales blowing hard, waves crashing through the ice walls that they created in a previous storm, snow obscuring the landscape and much of the horizon. It is truly a most amazing experience, but when I tell people that I enjoy feeling this raw power of nature, I can see in their eyes that they do not understand. So, let me explain…

Laying on the icy Lake Superior shoreline at sunset.

When we describe people as wild, we imagine chaos – a shirt buttoned askew, hair unkempt and unruly. And in nature’s wild, we see something similar though we do not apply the same judgment. In nature’s wild there is order, there is reason, whether or not we are able to comprehend it. The fresh green leaves and grass of summer are easy to appreciate, but it takes a special kind of observation to appreciate nature on a gloomy and overcast day.

In the fall and winter months, nature’s wild looks a bit like a human’s – the bare webs of tree branches outstretched like staticky-electric hair, wilting grasses like a pile of dirty laundry that didn’t quite make it to the hamper. During this time, we can see a side of nature that is ‘uncurated’ and perfectly imperfect. The wild that I experience on that windswept and icy shoreline is a powerful reminder that I am, with all of my imperfections, part of this wild nature, and I thoroughly enjoy feeling it push back as I lean into each gust.

The special places that MNA protects as Nature Sanctuaries across the state are protected because someone at some point in time connected with that particular place, either because of its beautiful native species or the incredible rarity of its landscape. Nature inspires us to think outside ourselves, beyond our daily needs and struggles, and makes us feel connected to the earth.

You may still think that my enjoyment of a winter storm on an icy beach is a bit unorthodox, but I hope that the message resonates with you. In whatever way you enjoy wildness in nature, whether that be a hike through the forest on a warm sunny day (without any bugs), or a native pollinator garden in your community, know that these places are as much a part of us as we are of them. And in order for others to enjoy them as we do now, they need our care and protection.

This #GivingTuesday, as you consider your charitable options, please consider giving to the Michigan Nature Association – and know that your gift may be helping to protect a ‘wild’ natural place that inspires someone now and in the future. Donate today at michigannature.org

Sanctuary Spotlight: Thornapple Lake

Thornapple Lake Nature Sanctuary is one of MNA’s many inland-lake sanctuaries, protecting roughly 60 acres of lakeshore where the Thornapple River enters the Thornapple Lake in Barry County. The densely forested sanctuary would be a tempting destination for hiking and exploration if not for the wet terrain making trails impractical. This type of habitat, which floods every spring, is known as a floodplain forest.

The low banks along the Thornapple River allow for the natural fluctuations in water levels.

The Thornapple River, a major tributary of the Grand River which drains into Lake Michigan, travels nearly 90 miles through primarily agricultural land, and is disrupted at several points by man-made dams built to control its frequent flooding. From the tributary east of Charlotte until it joins Thornapple Lake the river flows freely, though with the appearance of a creek.

This floodplain forest area is therefore an important part of the landscape. Floodplain forests serve an important role in increasing natural water quality as pollutants get filtered out of the floodwaters through the soil. They also provide critical habitat for several rare birds, such as Baltimore Oriole, Cerulean Warbler and American Woodcock. The saturated soils of floodplain forests thaw earlier in the spring than surrounding soils, creating critical opportunities for early migratory birds to find food on their way to summer breeding grounds.

A great blue heron hunts along the shoreline at Thornapple Lake Nature Sanctuary.

The area around Thornapple Lake, however, has become heavily developed over the years with waterfront homes and neighborhoods which intersect the shoreline. The development impacts the ability of waterfowl and other species to use the lake for feeding and breeding. Concerned with the overdevelopment of the lakeshore, Richard and Rosemary Shuster donated the land that has become Thornapple Lake Nature Sanctuary in 2009.

Many of MNA’s Nature Sanctuaries are known for being incredible destinations for hiking with spectacular overlooks, abundant spring wildflowers, and more. But sanctuaries like Thornapple Lake are a reminder that prioritizing the protection of Michigan’s rich natural heritage for wildlife and not just human enjoyment, is just as worthwhile.