Sanctuary Spotlight: Fred Dye Nature Sanctuary

One of the distinguishing characteristics of a Michigan Nature Association nature sanctuary is its accessibility to the public. Some sanctuaries are so “off the beaten-path” that they require a heavy duty off-road vehicle, and lots of determination on behalf of the visitor to make the journey. Others are so easily accessed, you might accidentally stumble across them during your daily commute. The Fred Dye Nature Sanctuary in Mackinac County is one of the latter.

Fred Dye

Fred Dye at the dedication of the sanctuary on August 7, 2004.

Located along the side of M-123 at the ghost town of Kenneth in the Eastern Upper Peninsula, the sanctuary was originally named “Purple Coneflower Plant Preserve” due to the abundance of purple coneflowers that can be found blooming here in late summer. It was renamed in 2004 to honor former MNA trustee, steward, and outstanding volunteer Charles Frederic Dye, Jr.

This sanctuary is unique among MNA sanctuaries, as it contains notable cultural, natural, and geological features within its 21 acres. Visitors to the sanctuary will find karst features such as exposed bedrock, thin soils, and deep earth cracks; a unique local feature resulting from the Niagara Escarpment rock formation. There are also numerous prairie species typically found in the tall grass prairie region of Illinois, Iowa and southern Wisconsin and Minnesota.

_D402523

An American Lady butterfly (Vanessa virginiensis) on a pale purple coneflower. Photo taken at Fred Dye Nature Sanctuary during the Michigan Nature Association 60th Anniversary Odyssey Tour, by Marianne Glosenger.

The ghost town of Kenneth was a small and thriving logging town from the 1880s through the 1930s, which laid along the railroad line. For a short time until the 1930s, Kenneth established a Civilian Conservation Corps camp housing 300 men who worked primarily on repairing forest fire damage in the surrounding forests after a series of forest fires between 1915 and the 1930s. What is now the Fred Dye Nature Sanctuary used to contain the town’s general store and saloon, the foundations of which can still be found in the sanctuary.

Although there are no official trails at Fred Dye, it is easily navigated due to its open prairie habitat. As you travel along M-123 roughly 20 miles north of the Mackinac Bridge, be on the lookout for the distinctive MNA sanctuary sign along the west side of the road and remember to “take only pictures, and leave only footprints.”

 

Advertisement

Reminiscing on a Decade of Accomplishments

As we all begin another rotation around the sun, we look forward to what a new year brings with it – hope, optimism, and the promise of new beginnings. We also like to take a moment to reflect on the accomplishments of the previous year – though as we begin a new decade in 2020, MNA would like to expand that thought and remember some of our major accomplishments of the past ten years.

Since 2010, MNA has acquired nearly 40 parcels and conservation easements, bringing the total number of nature sanctuaries under MNA management to 181.

In 2012, MNA celebrated the 60th anniversary of the founding of our organization, which began as a group of bird enthusiasts, whose concern for protecting the ecological diversity of Southeast Michigan grew to become the oldest statewide land conservancy in Michigan.

In 2014, MNA honored its commitment to our members, donors, and the public about our ability to uphold their trust and protect important natural lands forever by successfully earning accreditation through the national Land Trust Accreditation Commission. And we followed on to that commitment with successful accreditation renewal in 2019, joining a network of more than 400 accredited land trusts across the country that have proven trustworthy in their professional excellence and conservation methods.

In the summer of 2014, MNA underwent a major move, from a 2,400 square foot house in Williamston to a 10,000 square foot office space, which we share with a number of other conservation organizations including Michigan Audubon, the Michigan Wetlands Association, and the most recent addition, the Kirtland’s Warbler Alliance.

A Space for Collaboration

MNA outgrew our office in Williamston and moved our headquarters to nearby Okemos – visit us at 2310 Science Parkway!

Also in 2014 and into 2015, MNA was a key stakeholder in the Michigan Department of Natural Resources’ effort to update the state’s Wildlife Action Plan – a critical and partnership driven tool in defining the wildlife and habitat conservation goals for the state over a ten-year period.

DSC_0073MNA celebrated its 65th anniversary in 2017 and into 2018 with an extremely successful fundraising campaign to expand one of our showcase sanctuaries, Estivant Pines. The campaign celebrated the sanctuary’s 45th anniversary. The newest addition to this landmark sanctuary protects an additional 60 acres of old growth white pine forest in the Keweenaw Peninsula, bringing the sanctuary to a total of 570 acres.

 

Finally, in 2019, we were honored to be a recipient of one of the Consumers Energy Foundation’s inaugural Planet Award grants, which will help us save critical habitat in the state through protection, restoration, and enhancement projects at or adjacent to eleven of our more than 180 nature sanctuaries.

We are so proud of everyone who has helped us achieve each of these amazing accomplishments, and many more, over the last decade.