MNA’s Guide to Gifts for Nature – Part II

Give the Gift of Nature

mna logo with red bow

Give to nature and know you are making a real and lasting impact for Michigan’s rare, threatened and endangered species and imperiled natural communities.
 
Your contribution will be put to work immediately to safeguard important natural areas, restore critical habitat, and connect young people to nature.
 
65th anniversary logo
 
An easy and convenient way to help protect our natural heritage and spread your gift out over a period of time.
 
good kid picture
 
Check with your tax advisor about potential tax savings with a gift of appreciated stocks, bond or other securities to MNA.
 
zKarner1.KarnerMNA.MarilynKeigley 2
 
If your New Year’s resolution includes estate planning and a desire to leave a lasting legacy for nature, contact Garret Johnson, (866) 223-2231 or gjohnson@michigannature.org, for a confidential conversation about becoming an MNA Guardian of the Future.
 
BareBluffCCRoverlook by Kelly Ramstack 2
 
Watch for more giving ideas throughout the month!
Donate today at michigannature.org!
Advertisements

MNA’s Guide to Gifts for Nature – Part I

Give the Gift of Nature to Friends & Family

mna logo with red bow

For meaningful gifts that make a real difference for Michigan’s rare plants and animals, look no further!
 
Lucky recipients will receive a full year of Michigan Nature magazine, opportunities for free email updates with the latest nature news, and invitations to hikes, tours and exciting events in 2018.
 
two magazine covers
 
Donate a gift of any amount to honor someone on your list or to remember a loved one.
 
Brown Family sep06 (11) 2
 
A great stocking stuffer for animal lovers of all ages – a beautiful certificate features one of six important Michigan species and identifies the holder as a proud sponsor of Michigan nature.
 
Give to Michigan Species Image
 
Your gift will support our environmental education programs. You can help inspire a lifelong love of nature in children – our next generation of caretakers of the natural world.
 
Deb Iwema's class 2
 
Watch for more giving ideas throughout the month!
Donate today at michigannature.org!

 

Field Experience at Dauner Martin Nature Sanctuary

Two enthusiastic interns and a grant from the Franklin D. Adams Fund of the Community Foundation of Greater Flint made a big difference this summer for one of MNA’s most popular nature sanctuaries, the Dauner Martin Nature Sanctuary in Fenton.

Andrew Borin recounts his summer internship experience:

Our time with MNA has proved to be a positive experience for both Ashlie and I. Neither of us could have imagined the positive reactions that we received from the volunteers, MNA staff and community members who recognized the work we accomplished in our time at Dauner Martin Nature Sanctuary. Ashlie and I came from different academic backgrounds but shared one common goal during the internship: to work hard and make the largest impact we could. Every day we gave our all and pushed through the never-ending wall of invasive shrubs that plagues the sanctuary. The most common of which was autumn olive. Dauner Martin was our home for the summer and offered many challenges.

Dauner Martin - Andrew BaconWhat Dauner Martin Nature Sanctuary lacks in rare species, it makes up for in the role it plays within the community. The sanctuary sits within a business district in Fenton, Michigan. This urban setting makes it a unique sanctuary for Michigan Nature Association and offers benefits and problems not found within their other properties. With two entrances into the sanctuary located close to a busy road, the roughly 4.5 miles of trails are frequented by Fenton’s local citizens. Having a 155-acre green space in a city offers many positives ecologically and for the community. Not only do visitors get to hike and enjoy the pine plantations, prairies, wetlands and hardwood forests offered by the sanctuary, it is also used by local organizations to help promote outdoor activities and an appreciation for nature. On the ecological side of things, the sanctuary also acts as a haven for an assortment of wildlife and promotes ground water recharge.

native plant garden - Andrew BorinOur common workday included a variety of activities. Trash clean up and trail maintenance was usually reserved for our down-time. We also installed a 1,700 square foot native garden which we hope will grow and flourish. But the majority of our time was spent cutting down invasive shrubs using power tools and treating the stumps with herbicide. After the shrubs were cut, we would haul the branches through the understory and stack them into piles. Overall we cleared over 10 acres performing these day-to-day activities.

Ashlie and Andrew at DMWith the internship completed, Ashlie and I are headed back to school to finish our final two semesters before entering the workforce. I will be finishing my degree in Plant Biology at Michigan State University with the intention of working in habitat conservation and restoration. Ashlie intends to work with fisheries in the Upper Peninsula after completing her degree in Fisheries and Wildlife at the University of Michigan. As we look towards our futures, I speak for both of us when I say that we will always look back at our time at Dauner Martin fondly and I’m sure we’ll be back to see what improvements have been made to the sanctuary. We can’t thank MNA enough for giving us this experience and will use what we have learned as a platform, upon which we will build our future careers.

Thank you Andrew and Ashlie for all of your hard work!

Recognizing Outstanding Volunteers in 2017

 

Cover photo

2017 Volunteer & Donor Recognition Dinner

Thank you for joining MNA as we recognized the donors and volunteers who make our
continued success possible! The 2017 Volunteer & Donor Recognition Dinner
honored those who dedicate countless hours to MNA and reflected on another year of success.

The night was filled with entertainment, including a special silent auction to benefit
MNA’s Environmental Education Fund and a live performance by Lansing’s soul-blues master, Root Doctor!

   

Award Recipients

During the ceremony, MNA honored the following individuals for their
commitment to protecting Michigan’s natural heritage:

Richard W. Holzman Award:
Margaret Welsch

Frederick W. Case, Jr. Environmental Educator of the Year Award:
Deb Iwema

Mason and Melvin Schafer Distinguished Service Award:
Bill Atkinson

Volunteer of the Year Award:
Dan Burton
Brett Harris
Bill Houston
Phil Quenzi

Good Neighbor Award:
Valerie and John Vance
Clay DeGayner

Also a special congratulations to our 2017 Photo Contest winners,
Race for Michigan Nature 5K runners, and Eagle Scouts!

Like, share, and tag yourself in the photos from the dinner on our Facebook page!

We appreciate all you do for MNA’s mission and we hope to see you again next year!

Fall 2017 Michigan Nature Magazine

Fall means back to school, and that new reality brings a seasonal change to the daily migration routes for many Michigan families.

Fall is an especially great time of year to connect kids to nature and the incredible changes that unfold. As students – and their parents – adjust their new clocks and adapt to a new school year, here at MNA we are working with teachers to enrich their student’s classroom learning by using MNA nature sanctuaries as living laboratories. Our schools-to-sanctuaries initiative is creating exciting new partnerships across the state, like the one described by Addison High School teacher Aaron Wesche in this issue’s Q&A (p.33).

Cooler temperatures and decreasing daylight are signals for migratory birds and insects that it is time to leave their northern breeding grounds for warmer winter climes. Some make extraordinary difficult journeys to do so. One of the most astonishing dramas in nature is the annual Monarch butterfly migration from the northern U.S. to a tiny strip of forest in Mexico. Take yourself to a Great Lakes beach or an MNA nature sanctuary with open fields this time of year and wait and watch. You’ll very likely see one of these stunning and fragile beauties flit by as they make their miraculous journey to Mexico.

Sadly, those who have spent a lifetime watching the Monarch migration for the sheer joy of it will tell you they don’t see as many butterflies anymore. Scientists who study the Monarch have confirmed this. In this issue, noted Michigan author Bill Rapai tells the story of how the Monarch migration is now in serious danger of disappearing (p. 18).

The good news is that we can play a role in helping this extraordinary migration (while also helping other declining pollinators). We know that many of our nature sanctuaries provide necessary places for fuel and rest for Monarchs on their journey, but we also know much more needs to be done.

With your continued support MNA will be working to create more Monarch-friendly habitat within our statewide network of sanctuaries; help inspire the next generation to care about Michigan’s natural wonders like the Monarch butterfly through our education programs; and coordinate our work on Monarch conservation with the work of like-minded groups in Michigan, across the Midwest, and Mexico.

Spring 2017 Michigan Nature Magazine

MNA is no stranger to the fight to protect vulnerable species. For 65 years MNA has worked hard to secure and restore habitat and manage lands so rare plants and animals have a chance. A new endangered species listing hits hard even when it comes with the good news that federal protections will be put in place to help recover the species.

It also hits hard because of the news from Washington D.C. and Lansing about proposed deep cuts to programs that protect these vulnerable species.

The current political climate underscores the foresight of MNA’s founders. 65 years ago, a small group of spirited individuals took matters into their own hands and established an organization to do what they felt government was ignoring. How many more endangered species listings would there be without groups like MNA?

So today when so many headlines bring dismay, you only need to open the pages of Michigan Nature to find some really terrific stories of great work to protect our natural heritage. Stories made possible by people who deeply care and give from the heart – landowners, members, donors, volunteers and you.

Partnerships and collaboration are key. If the last 65 years have taught us anything, they’ve taught us that we cannot do it alone.

MNA’s mission brings people together so we can build a brighter future. We have been doing so for 65 years and will continue to do so for the next 65 years and beyond. Thank you for doing your part.

Spring 17 magazine cover

2016 Year in Review

2016 was an incredibly important and successful year for MNA! We are excited to provide this 2016 Year in Review, a snapshot of a remarkable year and a powerful testament to the tremendous work made possible by our members, volunteers, and donors. There are may stories to celebrate as we take a look back at a busy year. Here are just a few highlights:

  • We completed nine land acquisition projects adding more than 800 acres to our statewide network of nature sanctuaries.
  • We restored critical habitat for endangered species including the eastern prairie fringed orchid, Karner blue butterfly, Blanchard’s cricket frog and the eastern massasauga rattlesnake.
  • We worked with teachers and schools, and reached out to families and communities, to help connect children with nature.

Our founders envisioned an organization that would connect people with nature and leave a lasting legacy by protecting Michigan’s unique natural heritage. We can say with confidence that our 2016 accomplishments uphold that bold vision while preparing us for the difficult work ahead.

Thank you to our members, donors, and volunteers for making 2016 a great success and a year to remember! If you would like to support MNA, you can become a member or make a tax-deductible contribution.

2016 Year in Review Cover