Learn about monarch protection at the Annual Meeting on April 29 in Grand Rapids

monarchs at Fred Dye by Adrienne Bozic

Join the Michigan Nature Association at the
2017 Annual Meeting
Frederik Meijer Gardens – Grand Rapids
Celebrating 65 Years

Saturday, April 29 – 12:30 p.m.
1000 East Beltline Ave, Grand Rapids, Michigan

Join the Michigan Nature Association for the 2017
Annual Meeting on Saturday, April 29 at 12:30 p.m.
at the Frederik Meijer Gardens and Sculpture Park
in Grand Rapids. Your free ticket to the Annual Meeting
includes admission into the Gardens and Sculpture Park!

The event will feature talks from MNA’s Executive Director
and Conservation Director, an exciting look inside some our
latest projects, and light refreshments.

Special Guest Speaker

Dr. Stephen Malcolm is a chemical ecologist and
biological sciences professor at Western Michigan University.
He will be discussing monarch butterfly conservation
in Michigan and beyond.

RSVP Today – Seating is Limited

Please RSVP by April 21 to reserve your spot.
Contact Jess at 866-223-2231 or jfoxen@michigannature.org.

We hope to see you there!

Water Quality Partnerships, Poweshiek Skipperling, and Dragonflies: this week in environmental news

Local land conservancies, Watershed Council partner up to safeguard water quality (The Livingston Post): Local land conservancies, including the Michigan Nature Association, and the Huron River Watershed Council joined forces in 2014, to help private land owners protect natural areas with the potential to impact water quality. This month, the partnership will hold information sessions throughout the Huron River’s watershed so that land owners can learn about the land protection process and register for free land assessment tools. The Huron River is considered Michigan’s cleanest urban river. It owes this designation both to historic land conservation efforts and to the watershed’s remaining natural areas.

Reared-Poweshiek-Runquist-MN-Zoo

Reared Poweshiek skipperling. Photo: Erik Runquist/Minnesota Zoo.

Stopping Extinction of a Prairie Butterfly – Poweshiek Skipperling (U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service): The Poweshiek skipperling was listed as endangered in 2014. Prairie loss and degradation led to the initial decline of the species, but causes of the recent sharp decline remain a mystery. It is suspected that several threats may be responsible, such as an unknown disease or parasite, climate change, or use of pesticides. Research has begun in an effort to narrow down the cause or causes of the decline.

Superheroes build homes for bats (Great Lakes Echo): The Organization for Bat Conservation in Bloomfield, Michigan teamed up with Warner Bros. Entertainment Inc. and crew to raise funds and awareness for bat conservation. The set from Batman v. Superman: Dawn of Justice is getting recycled wood to auction off in the form of bat houses. The auction will be held on EBay and the money from the sales will go to the Save the Bat campaign.

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This Pantala dragonfly is a male from Japan. Photo: Alpsdake/Wikipedia

Tiny dragonfly species crushes long-distance migration record by riding high-altitude winds (Mother Nature Network): Barely an inch and a half long, the Pantala flavescens dragonfly flies across continents and oceans. Pantala dragonflies are found all over the world. Biologists recently discovered that it’s not just that some Pantala dragonflies migrate long-distance from here to there, but rather that the worldwide Pantala population is one giant gene pool, and individuals from all corners of the world are freely interbreeding. More research will be needed to gather the evidence necessary to fully prove this new hypothesis about travel via high-altitude winds, but the dragonfly’s roughly 4,400-mile migration range puts it well ahead of any other migratory insect.

Bat Study, Songbird Forest, and Nature Programs: this week in environmental news

bat

White-nose syndrome has killed 98 percent of the little brown bat population. Image: U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service

Bat recovery slow from white-nose syndrome (Great Lakes Echo): Little brown bat populations are unlikely to recover from a widespread fungal disease anytime soon, according to a recent study. This is worrisome since bats have a crucial role in the ecosystems in the Great Lakes and globally. They are the primary predators of night-time insects, pollinate over 300 species of fruit, and also keep forest ecosystems healthy. Studies about the diminishing bat population have pressured state officials to promote bat conservation. There are things ordinary citizens can do to help too, like replacing dead trees with bat houses so bats have a safe place to raise babies and replace lawns with wildflower gardens so bats have food.

‘Songbird Forest’ expands to save species (Mother Nature Network): A small nature preserve in Brazil’s Atlantic Forest has just grown by nearly 50%, thanks to conservationists working to save its array of wildlife from extinction. Known as Mata do Passarinho – Portuguese for “Songbird Forest” – this patch of Atlantic Forest has expanded to add 766 new acres, raising its total area from 1,586 to 2,352 acres. The forest is a haven for songbirds, many near extinction. Its most at-risk species is the critically endangered Stresemann’s bristlefront, whose estimated 15 survivors all live here.

songbird

A male Stresemann’s bristlefront in Mata do Passarinho, the species’ last-known refuge. Image: Ciro Albano

Ruling the sky: Presentation to focus on Michigan’s birds of prey (MLive): Great predators of the sky will swoop into Muskegon as part of a unique presentation later this month. The two-session event scheduled for 4 p.m. and 5:30 p.m. on Jan. 21 will be held at the Lakeshore Museum Center in downtown Muskegon. The presentations will discuss the habitats of both common and rare Michigan hawks and owls, as well as their importance to the ecosystem.

Nature Center Offers Variety of Programs for Preschoolers (Farmington-Farmington Hills Patch): The Farmington Hills Nature Center is offering a variety of nature preschool classes this winter. Winter preschool classes meet Jan. 19 through March 14 on Monday, Tuesday, and Thursday mornings. Each preschool class offers a different nature theme every week and time outdoors if weather permits.

MNA Looks Back on a Remarkable 2014

2014 has been an incredibly important and successful year for MNA! It’s impossible for one blog post to do justice to the amazing work of our staff and volunteers, but we’ve compiled a few highlights from throughout the year. Click on the images to enlarge and scroll through the gallery:

Check out out MNA’s 2014 Year in Review publication for more details about our progress in 2014. 

Thank you for making this a year to remember! If you’d like to support MNA, you can become a member or make a tax-deductible contribution.

More on Lake Erie’s algae blooms, the Toledo water crisis and looming urban sprawl: this week in environmental news

Toledo Mayor Michael Collins drinks tap water in front of the community after the ban was lifted. Photo by Karen Schaefer courtesy of the Great Lakes Echo.

Toledo Mayor Michael Collins drinks tap water in front of the community after the ban was lifted. Photo by Karen Schaefer courtesy of the Great Lakes Echo.

By Kary Askew Garcia, MNA Intern

Every Friday, MNA gathers news related to the environment from around the state and country. Here are a few highlights from what happened this week in environmental news:

Toledo water crisis passes but long term threat looms (Great Lakes Echo): Despite the scare and being unable to drink water, residents still found themselves apprehensive to drink Toledo tap water — despite Mayor Michael Collins drinking the water in front of them. Although there is no longer a ban on drinking the water, a larger problem prevails not only in northern Ohio communities but those along the Great Lakes Basin.

NASA satellite view of Lake Erie.

NASA satellite view of Lake Erie.

Behind Toledo’s water crisis: A long troubled Lake Erie (New York Times): Like the MNA post this past week about Lake Erie and damage of algal blooms, Michael Wines of the New York Times offers an in-depth look into the problem. The story tracks down the past of Lake Erie and discusses the trouble its faced in the past and how now scientists and government officials are taking serious concern to the issue due to the recent water crisis in Toledo.

6 Ways Nature is Inspiring Human Engineering (Forbes): Biomimetics, or the imitation of nature for the purpose of solving human problems, has led to new breakthroughs in technology. Researchers are looking at the eyes of moths to understand how their structure can be applied to solar technology as well as using spider silk for bulletproof vests.

Just how far will urban sprawl spread? (Conservation Magazine): The World Health Organization has predicted by 2050, 70 percent of the global population will reside in cities. This will inevitably increase urban sprawl — an issue that affects natural habitats and ecosystems worldwide.

 

Bid on Items to Benefit Conservation

Bid on a VIP wine tasting at Chateau Chantal! (Photo via Chateau Chantal)

Bid on a VIP wine tasting at Chateau Chantal! (Photo via Chateau Chantal)

On Friday, October 18, MNA will host the Volunteer and Donor Recognition Dinner at the Kellogg Hotel & Conference Center in East Lansing.

This year’s event includes a special silent auction to benefit MNA’s conservation initiatives! Join us to learn about MNA’s efforts, honor special volunteers, and mingle with fellow MNA supporters.

Silent auction items include:

Week-Long Getaway in Northern Michigan

Enjoy a week on Mullet Lake in northern Michigan in a vacation home with three bedrooms, two bathrooms, a field stone fireplace, ping-pong room, deck and dock. This house sleeps up to 10 people and is a beautiful retreat!

VIP Wine Tasting Experience for Six People

Enjoy a personal tour of the Chateau Chantal winery, an explanation of the winemaking process, and a personal wine tasting with a wine educator. See stunning views of the Old Mission Peninsula and explore the Old World Inn!

Bid on a sea kayak tour in Copper Harbor!  Photo: Ryan Holt

Bid on a sea kayak tour in Copper Harbor! (Photo: Ryan Holt)

Copper Harbor Sea Kayak Tour 

Explore Copper Harbor by kayak! This package includes two tickets for a two-and-a-half hour kayak exploration on Lake Superior, surrounding Copper Harbor. The tour includes kayak instruction, all equipment, and a professional guide.

Great Lakes Stone Shoreline Mirror

Artist Casey Williams uses stone he personally collects from Michigan’s Great Lakes to create beautiful functional stone products. Surrounded by stone from the Great Lakes, this mirror would make a beautiful addition to any room!

‘Ruin and Recovery’ Signed by Award-Winning Author Dave Dempsey

This copy of Ruin and Recovery: Michigan’s Rise as a Conservation Leader is signed by author Dave Dempsey, named Michigan Author of the Year in 2009.

Enamel on Copper Nature Sculptures

These beautiful sculptures are original designs, hand enameled by highly skilled artisans using traditional tools and techniques. This set of two sculptures is a unique interpretation of nature’s beauty.

Download the Auction Preview Guide for a complete list of available items! 

Purchase your tickets for the Volunteer and Donor Recognition Dinner today! Visit the MNA website or contact Danielle Cooke at 866-223-2231 or dcooke@michigannature.org. Seating is limited, so reserve your spot soon!

Plover rebound, mosquitoes, lake grants and a 216-mile kayak trip: this week in environmental news

By Allison Raeck, MNA Intern

Every Friday, MNA shares recent environmental news stories from around the state and country. Here’s some of what happened this week in environmental and nature news:

Image

A piping plover parent with chicks. Photo courtesy of Wikimedia Commons.

Plovers rebound with Conservation efforts (Grand Traverse Insider): Current measures to protect endangered piping plovers, small sparrow-like birds found on Great Lakes shores, are proving effective. The bird was listed as endangered in 1986, when only 12 pairs remained. The plover population has been slowly rising since then, with 58 pairs recorded last year. Attempting to raise these numbers, conservationists are breeding the birds in protected areas of the Platte River Mouth, incubating abandoned chicks and eggs and educating the public to stay away from areas reserved for rehabilitation. Though it will take some time to reach the recovery goal of 150 pairs, conservationists remain optimistic.

Urban blackbirds are more cautious than country birds (Conservation Magazine): Recent studies show that city-dwelling blackbirds show greater restraint than those from rural areas. A team of researchers collected 28 young blackbirds from the urban atmosphere of Munich, Germany as well as 25 blackbirds from a nearby forest. The team found that city birds took an average of half an hour longer than rural birds to perch near an unfamiliar object, which they say is likely a result of genetic personality differences.

Experts: Mosquitoes in Muskegon County showing normal activity for late spring, no West Nile Virus cases confirmed (mlive): Though the recent mosquito invasion around Michigan may seem especially intense, experts say that these numbers are nothing out of the ordinary for the spring season. April’s heavy rainfall combined with warm temperatures provided the ideal habitat for spring mosquitoes, which are expected to experience a population peak for the next 2-3 weeks. Experts say that, though West Nile Virus does not appear to be particularly present in Michigan this spring, it is important to watch for the virus this coming summer.

U-M Water Center Awards $570K in Great Lakes Restoration Grants (Great Lakes Now): The University of Michigan Water Center, a Great Lakes education and research organization, awarded twelve, two-year research grants yesterday. The grants were awarded to projects that followed one or more of the federal Great Lakes Restoration Initiative’s four focus areas: extracting toxic contaminants, combating invasive species, protecting wildlife and clearing nearshore areas of polluted runoff. Projects range from tracking harmful algae blooms to monitoring fish responses to restoration initiatives.

Student completes 216-mile kayak trip for fundraiser (Detroit Free Press): A student from Western Michigan University completed a 216-mile kayaking journey on Tuesday. Cody Ledsworth began the trip on Wednesday, May 15, paddling against the wind down the Muskegon River. Throughout the trip, he gathered donations for Parkinson’s disease research, inspired by his grandmother who has the disease. The 20-year-old eventually raised more than $2,300 for the nonprofit Parkinson’s Disease Foundation, far surpassing his original $500 goal.