Give to Michigan Species this Holiday Season!

Give to Michigan Species Image

This holiday season why not Give to Turtles or other special animals found in Michigan? You can show your support with a $10 gift to the Michigan Nature Association. In return, we’ll send you a certificate identifying the holder (add your name or someone on your gift list) as a proud sponsor of Michigan nature. The certificate, 8 ½” by 11” and suitable for framing, includes a photo of an important animal found in Michigan and is accompanied by a fact sheet with great information about that species.

Order online for the holidays by December 18 at or pay by mail and send in this order form. Choose the animal(s) you would like on the order form or let us choose for you. Order forms can be mailed to the MNA office or emailed to Jess at

Makes a great stocking stuffer for kids, grandkids, and nature lovers of all ages! Proceeds support MNA’s mission to protect rare, threatened and endangered species in Michigan.

Animals to choose from:

Karner blue butterfly
Karner Blue Butterfly

Monarch Butterfly

Box Turtle
Eastern Box Turtle


lake sturgeon
Lake Sturgeon

Eastern Massasauga Rattlesnake


2017 Photo Contest Winners Announced!

Congratulations to our 2017 Photo Contest winners! Thank you to everyone that submitted a photo – we had many great options to choose from! Photos were submitted in three categories: Flora & Fauna, Landscapes, and People in Nature in order to capture Michigan’s natural beauty.

Grand Prize Winner!
“Lower Tahquamenon Falls” by Deb Traxinger

Overall Winner - Traxinger, Deb - Lower Tahquamenon Falls

Flora & Fauna

First Place:
“Singing Swallows” by Margaret Weber

Second Place:
“Redbud Romance” by Dustyn Blindert

Third Place:
“Karner Blue Butterfly” at MNA’s Karner Blue Nature Sanctuary in Newaygo County by Randy Butters

Honorable Mention:
“Flower & Fungi” at MNA’s Trillium Ravine Nature Sanctuary in Berrien County by Ellen Stevens


First Place:
“Huron” by Nathan Miller

Second Place:
“Lost Lake” by Ellen Wexler

Third Place:
“Sunrise at Seney” by Todd Maertz

Honorable Mention:
“Fairyland Meadow” by Virginia McClellan

People in Nature

First Place:
“5 Star Cuisine” by Alex Maier

Second Place:
“Pictured Rocks Kayakers” by Tom Ala

Third Place:
“Best Friends” by Ellen Wexler

Honorable Mention:
“Exploring with Pop” by Susan Cobb

What’s the Scoop with Michigan’s Soil?

By Michelle Ferrell, MNA Intern

Though not always the most celebrated components of a landscape, soils are certainly one of the most important. While plants form the basis of habitats, soils are central in determining which plants can grow where. Consequently, the soil/s of an ecosystem can drastically affect wildlife communities. Soils also play a critical role in filtering fresh water, and have served as the very foundations of civilization. How much do you know about the marvel beneath your feet?

kalkaska sand

Kalkaska sand. Photo: Randall Schaetzl.

In 1990, Michigan declared Kalkaska sand as its official state soil. It’s relatively infertile owing to its acidic nature, but nonetheless abundant. Despite being one of over 500 soils present in Michigan, Kalkaska sand, so named for one of the 29 counties in which it is present, covers nearly 5% of the state. It can be found in the upper half of the lower peninsula, as well as most of the upper peninsula; but just how did it get there?

The movement of glaciers shaped Michigan’s soils over the course of hundreds of thousands of years into what is known as glacial till. Read more about the process here. In the time since, our soils have undergone many changes to provide support for forests, wetlands, prairies, dunes, swamps, and human agriculture alike. In fact, if not for Kalkaska sand, the coniferous forests of northern Michigan may not exist.

Many of the evergreens that grow in our northern forests, including our ever-important state tree (white pine), are adapted to highly acidic, dry, and nutrient-poor conditions. As such, they rely on otherwise infertile soils like Kalkaska sand. The rare Kirtland’s warbler breeds exclusively in jack pine, and many other well-known species depend upon plant communities derived from Kalkaska sand. In a very real way, we have this unique soil to thank for the natural landscape as we know it today.

kirtlands warbler - cindy mead

Kirtland’s warbler in a jack pine forest. Photo: Cindy Mead.

Recognizing Outstanding Volunteers in 2017


Cover photo

2017 Volunteer & Donor Recognition Dinner

Thank you for joining MNA as we recognized the donors and volunteers who make our
continued success possible! The 2017 Volunteer & Donor Recognition Dinner
honored those who dedicate countless hours to MNA and reflected on another year of success.

The night was filled with entertainment, including a special silent auction to benefit
MNA’s Environmental Education Fund and a live performance by Lansing’s soul-blues master, Root Doctor!


Award Recipients

During the ceremony, MNA honored the following individuals for their
commitment to protecting Michigan’s natural heritage:

Richard W. Holzman Award:
Margaret Welsch

Frederick W. Case, Jr. Environmental Educator of the Year Award:
Deb Iwema

Mason and Melvin Schafer Distinguished Service Award:
Bill Atkinson

Volunteer of the Year Award:
Dan Burton
Brett Harris
Bill Houston
Phil Quenzi

Good Neighbor Award:
Valerie and John Vance
Clay DeGayner

Also a special congratulations to our 2017 Photo Contest winners,
Race for Michigan Nature 5K runners, and Eagle Scouts!

Like, share, and tag yourself in the photos from the dinner on our Facebook page!

We appreciate all you do for MNA’s mission and we hope to see you again next year!