2018 Race for Michigan Nature

5K Race Banner for social media

Sign up today! 
Join MNA in the
Race for Michigan Nature
series across the state

Enjoy the beautiful outdoors and run, walk, or jog
along the park trails in select cities across Michigan
with the Michigan Nature Association!

MNA’s statewide Race for Michigan Nature series
of Family Fun Runs & 5Ks stretches from Belle Isle
in Detroit to Marquette in the U.P. The races are
endorsed by the Governor’s Council on Physical Fitness,
Health and Sports and qualify for the Pure Michigan Challenge.

The Family Fun Runs & 5Ks will promote efforts to
preserve habitat for threatened and endangered
species throughout Michigan.

Register Today

Bring the whole family! The Kids Fun Run will
be a 1 mile race 30 minutes prior to the 5K.

Kids 1 Mile Fun Run: $10
5K Run/Walk: Early registration is just $25 ($30 day-of).

Participants will receive a
commemorative Run t-shirt,
a finisher medal, and a
Discover Michigan Nature drawstring bag!
Prizes for the top male and female runners.

Volunteers are also needed!
We’re looking for energetic individuals and organizations
to provide great customer service to our 5K participants.
Interested in helping with registration, monitoring along
the course, or handing out medals?
We have a spot for everyone!

If you have any questions please call Jess at
866-223-2231 or email her at jfoxen@michigannature.org.

We hope to see you there!

Find a race in your area!

Grand Rapids
​Karner Blue Butterfly Family Fun Run & 5K
Sunday, May 20
Millennium Park
Register!

Karner Blue 5K logo - 300 dpi 2

Kalamazoo
Monarch March Family Fun Run & 5K
Saturday, June 9
Mayor’s Riverfront Park – Kalamazoo River Valley Trail
Register!

Monarch March 5K logo - 300 dpi

Rochester
Rattlesnake Family Fun Run & 5K
Saturday, June 30
Rochester Municipal Park – Paint Creek Trail
Register!

Rattlesnake Run 5K logo - 300 dpi

Detroit
Sturgeon Sprint Family Fun Run & 5K
Sunday, August 12
Belle Isle Park
Register!

sturgeonlogo - BLUE

Marquette
Moose on the Loose Family Fun Run & 5K
Saturday, August 25
Presque Isle Park
Register!

mooselogo - GREEN 2

Ann Arbor
Turtle Trot Family Fun Run & 5K
Sunday, September 16
Gallup Park
Register!

Turtle Run 5K logo - 300 dpi

Advertisements

Spring has Sprung?

By Abby Pointer, MNA Intern

As usual, Michigan is having a little bit of trouble deciding when it wants to transition into springtime. Don’t let the occasional snow shower worry you, there are a few sure signs that you can look for to keep up hope that spring is on its way! Michigan’s beloved flora and fauna will bring the sounds and sights of springtime, such as the spring peeper, the American robin, and wild trilliums.

spring peeper - tim mayo

Spring peeper. Photo: Tim Mayo.

Some music to your ears might be the classic “tinkling of bells” of the Michigan spring peeper. Around early March, when the ground begins thawing, this abundant amphibian species begins its mating season. The peeping you hear is the male frog calling out to potential mates. The more intense the peeping, the more likely the males are to attract their desired female. If you live near wetland areas, such as a damp woodland, marsh, or pond, you are likely to hear these creatures singing away on a warming spring night.

american robin - taran rampersad

American robin. Photo: Tara Rampersad.

While the spring peepers sing you to sleep, another sign that spring is near is being awoken by the return of migratory birds. The classic harbinger of spring is the American robin, Michigan’s state bird. You might recognize its song from the often repeated whistle of cheerily, cheer up, cheer up, cheerily, cheer up. When the average temperature fluctuates around 37 degrees, the male robins will be the first to make themselves known as they establish territories and begin feeding. Female robins will return a couple weeks later to begin building nests and feeding on worms from the thawing grounds. You’ll hear them start singing as they arrive on their breeding territories!

Another bird that is usually a first sign of spring in Michigan is the red-winged blackbird, with some arriving as early as mid-February. Males will sing their song, conk-la-ree from a high perch, awaiting the female response of a series of several chits. These birds prefer wetland areas, so if you are near standing water and vegetation, look out for these birds. You will also start seeing more shorebirds and hearing more owls and woodpeckers. The return of these birds from late March through May marks prime bird watching season.

trillium - mary bohling

Trillium. Photo: Mary Bohling.

You might notice the budding of trees, and if you look closely some wildflowers are indicators that spring is on its way. The trillium is one that you might see first, a three petaled flower with dark green leaves and pale green accents. The arrival of the wildflowers ushers in the return of pollinators to help speed the spring process along!

Vernal Pool Patrol Training Workshops

The Michigan Natural Features Inventory and MSU Extension are hosting three FREE vernal pool patrol training workshops this spring! Sign up today to learn more about vernal pools and how you can help monitor and protect these important wetlands!

Sunday, April 8
Leslie Science and Nature Center
1831 Traver Road, Ann Arbor
10:00 a.m. – 3:00 p.m.
RSVP: Phyllis Higman at higman@msu.edu or 517-242-3269

Leslie Science Center_Vernal Pool Training_4-8-18_FBfinal

Friday, April 13
Hemlock Crossing Nature Education Center
8115 West Olive Road, West Olive, Ottawa County
10:00 a.m. – 3:00 p.m.
RSVP: Ashley Adkins at hurdashl@msu.edu or 517-284-6211

Ottawa Co. April 13 Workshop- FB

Saturday, April 21
Hemlock Crossing Nature Education Center
8115 West Olive Road, West Olive, Ottawa County
10:00 a.m. – 3:00 p.m.
RSVP: Ashley Adkins at hurdashl@msu.edu or 517-284-6211

Ottawa Co. April 21 Workshop- FB