Tree Check Month, New Eyes in the Field App, and Invasive Crayfish: this week in environmental news

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Asian Longhorned Beetle. Photo: DNR.

August is Tree Check Month (Statewide DNR News): The U.S Department of Agriculture has declared August as national Tree Check Month – time to be on the lookout for invasive, destructive pests threatening Michigan’s urban and forest landscapes. Take 10 minutes this month to check trees around homes for Asian longhorned beetle or any signs of the damage it causes. Like the emerald ash borer, the Asian longhorned beetle spends most of its life cycle eating its way through the insides of trees. What makes this beetle much more dangerous is that it feeds on a wide variety of tree species. Its first choice is maple, but it also will infest birch, elm, willow, buckeye, horse chestnut and other hardwoods. Trees infested with Asian longhorned beetle must be destroyed to prevent the insect from spreading.

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Massasauga rattlesnake. Photo: USFWS Midwest.

DNR calls on citizen scientists to report cougars, feral hogs, and other wildlife with new app (Michigan Radio): The Department of Natural Resources invites Michigan residents to contribute to conservation efforts by reporting their fish and wildlife observations with the new Eyes in the Field application. Available at michigan.gov/eyesinthefield, the application replaces 15 separate observation forms the DNR had been using to gather important information about the state’s fish and wildlife populations. Eyes in the Field includes forms for reporting observations of diseased wildlife, tagged fish, mammals such as cougars and feral swine, fish such as sturgeon, birds such as wild turkeys, and reptiles and amphibians such as eastern massasauga rattlesnakes. Additional observation forms will be added in the future.

crown shyness trees

Crown Shyness. Photo: Dag Peak.

Trees are aware of their neighbors and give them room (Treehugger): In ‘crown shyness,’ some tree species respect those nearby and keep their leaves to themselves. The phenomenon has been studied since the 1920s, and is also known as canopy disengagement, canopy shyness, or intercrown spacing. It doesn’t happen in all tree species; some species that do it only do it with trees from the same species – some species do it with their own as well as other species.

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MDEQ Minute YouTube video. Photo: MDEQ.

New video gives tips on identifying red swamp crayfish (Statewide DNR News): Though they are native to southern states, red swamp crayfish are considered invasive in Michigan because they compete aggressively with native crayfish species for food and habitat. They feed on plants, insects, snails, juvenile fish and other crayfish, disrupting the food chain for many aquatic species. The Michigan Department of Environmental Quality has created a new video to help people identify and report red swamp crayfish. The video is the third in the department’s MDEQ Minute series, offering 60-second views on a broad range of topics including new and potential invasive species in Michigan.

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