2017 Race for Michigan Nature to Benefit Endangered Species

5K Race Banner for social media

Sign up today! 
Join MNA in the Race for Michigan Nature series across the state

Enjoy the beautiful outdoors and run, walk, or jog along the park trails in select cities across Michigan with the Michigan Nature Association!

MNA’s statewide Race for Michigan Nature series of Family Fun Runs & 5Ks stretches from Belle Isle in Detroit to Marquette in the U.P. The races are  endorsed by the Governor’s Council on Physical Fitness, Health and Sports and qualify for the Pure Michigan Challenge.

The Family Fun Runs & 5Ks will promote efforts to preserve habitat for threatened and endangered species throughout Michigan.

Register Today

Bring the whole family! The Kids Fun Run will be a 1 mile race 30 minutes prior to the 5K.

Kids 1 Mile Fun Run: $10
5K Run/Walk: Early registration is just $25 ($30 day-of).

Participants will receive a commemorative Run t-shirt and a finisher medal!
Prizes for the top male and female runners.

If you have any questions please call Jess at
866-223-2231 or email her at jfoxen@michigannature.org.

We hope to see you there!

Find a race in your area!

​Karner Blue Butterfly Family Fun Run & 5K
Saturday, May 20
Millennium Park, Grand Rapids
Register!

Karner Blue 5K logo - 300 dpi 2

Moose on the Loose Family Fun Run & 5K
Saturday, August 26
Presque Isle Park, Marquette
Register!

Moose 5K logo

Rattlesnake Family Fun Run & 5K
Sunday, September 17
Paint Creek Trail, Rochester
Register!

Rattlesnake Run 5K logo - 300 dpi

Turtle Family Fun Run & 5K
Sunday, September 24
Gallup Park, Ann Arbor
Register!

Turtle Run 5K logo - 300 dpi

Monarch March Family Fun Run & 5K
Sunday, October 1
Mayor’s Riverfront Park, Kalamazoo
Register!

Monarch March 5K logo - 300 dpi

Sturgeon Sprint Family Fun Run & 5K
Sunday, October 8
Belle Isle Park, Detroit
Register!

Sturgeon Logo

Modoc suckers, Monarch butterflies, and climate change: this week in environmental news

Service Removes Modoc Sucker from the Federal List of Threatened and Endangered Wildlife (U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service Press Release): The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service announced that, thanks to decades of collaborative conservation efforts under the Endangered Species Act (ESA), it is removing the Modoc sucker from the Act’s protections. This marks the second-time that a fish has been ‘delisted’ due to recovery. The Modoc sucker is a small fish native to the Upper Pit River Watershed in Southern Oregon and Northeastern California. The fish was listed as endangered in 1985 due to habitat loss and degradation from overgrazing, situation and channelization due to agriculture practices. The recovery of the Modoc sucker is a great victory for conservation, for the Endangered Species Act, and for our natural heritage.

modoc sucker

Modoc sucker taken off Endangered Species List. Photo: USFWS

Trust fund awards $28 million for Michigan public lands projects (Great Lakes Echo): Michigan’s Natural Resources Trust Fund will award nearly $28 million for public lands projects, including funds for the Department of Natural Resources (DNR) Wildlife and Parks and Recreation divisions. The DNR Wildlife Division will get $2.47 million for a Petobego State Game Area in Grand Traverse County land acquisition project. The primary goal is to provide essential habitats for migratory and resident wildlife and create opportunities for hunting, trapping, fishing, and wildlife viewing.

Report: Mexico’s Monarch Butterfly Reserve Lost 24 Acres (ABC News): Studies found that illegal loggers clear-cut at least 24 acres in the monarch butterflies’ wintering ground in central Mexico this year. The butterflies depend on the pine and fir forests west of Mexico City to shelter them against cold and rain. Environmentalists called on authorities to stop illegal logging in the butterfly reserve.

monarch butterflies

A kaleidoscope of Monarch butterflies hang from a tree branch, in the Piedra Herrada sanctuary. Photo: Rebecca Blackwell

Oneida Lake among hundreds worldwide warming due to climate change: study (Syracuse.com): A new study of more than 200 lakes around the world show that many – including Oneida Lake – are warming so rapidly that toxic algae outbreaks could become more frequent. Increasing warmth in lakes is projected to increase algal blooms by 20%, and toxic blooms by 5%, according to NASA. The warmer water could also alter the balance of ecosystems and threaten the livelihood of people who depend on fish from the lakes.

Monarch butterflies, climate change, and microbeads: this week in environmental news

Each week, MNA compiles news stores related to conservation and the environment from around Michigan and the country. Here is a look at some of what happened this week in environmental news:

Monarch butterflies at Fred Dye Nature Sanctuary. Photo: Adrienne Bozic

Monarch butterflies at Fred Dye Nature Sanctuary. Photo: Adrienne Bozic

Monarch butterfly count rises as conservationists warn of extinction (Reuters): This winter’s tally of monarch butterflies in Mexico rose to 56.5 million from last year’s record low of 34 million. Though this number is an improvement, it is still far below the 1 billion monarch butterflies that migrated to Mexico in the 1990s. Conservationists say the butterfly may warrant Endangered Species Act protections.

Most Americans support government action on climate change, poll finds (The New York Times): A poll conducted by The New York Times, Stanford University, and a nonpartisan research group found that an “overwhelming majority” of Americans support government action to curb global warming. This includes 48% of Republicans, who say they are more likely to vote for a candidate who supports fighting climate change. These findings could have implications for the 2016 presidential campaign.

Climate affects how the Great Lakes grow and flow (Great Lakes Echo): New projections suggest increases in maximum and minimum daily temperatures in the Lake Michigan basin by as much as 8 degrees in 2099. These rising temperatures will lead to increased precipitation and runoff during winter and a decrease in the Spring, especially in northern Michigan and Wisconsin. These seasonal temperatures will also impact wetlands and sensitive fish and invertebrate populations.

House committee passes measure banning soap, scrub microbeads that pollute Great Lakes (Minneapolis Star Tribune): A bill banning the tiny exfoliating plastic bits known as microbeads passed through an Indiana House committee Wednesday. The bill is part of an effort gaining momentum in other states to protect the Great Lakes. Microbeads are found in popular cosmetic products like facial scrubs and toothpastes. Microbeads currently account for about 20 percent of plastic pollution in the Great Lakes.

Climate change, monarch butterflies and a snowy owl invasion: this week in environmental news

By Alyssa Kobylarek, MNA Intern

Every Friday, MNA gathers news stories related to conservation and the environment from around the state and country. Here is some of what happened this week in environmental news:

A monarch butterfly feeding on swamp milkweed. Photo courtesy of Wikimedia Commons

A Monarch butterfly feeding on swamp milkweed. Photo courtesy of Wikimedia Commons

Michigan cities brace for a changing climate (Great Lakes Echo): Several cities across Michigan are preparing for climate trends that are already apparent in our state. Flooding, intense storms, extreme heat and falling water levels are all impacts that have developed in recent years. Some preparation plans include planting trees, putting solar panels on 360 state-owned buildings and setting a 100 percent renewable energy goal by the year 2020.

Possibility of oil fracking in Genesee County stokes environmental fears (mlive): Employees from the Western Land Services in the area are offering deals to people to sell the oil and minerals off their land, but the use of fracking is controversial. Environmental groups claim the process of oil fracking can harm groundwater and cause seismic disturbances, but supporters say it is done too far down below the aquifer to do damage. If there is enough interest to drill in the area, a permit would have to be granted in order to do so.

Asian carp issue seen as not stopping river barge concept for Muskegon Lake (mlive): The Army Corps of Engineers released a report to congress outlining eight possible approaches to stopping Asian carp from entering the Great Lakes through barges. Some solutions include separating the river system from the Great Lakes, but that would cost an estimated $18 billion. Many people fear the carp will threaten the Great Lakes fishing industry and are concerned about the river barge operation.

North American Leaders Urged to Restore Monarch Butterfly’s Habitat (New York Times): The leaders of Mexico, the United States and Canada have been urged to commit to restore habitat that supports the Monarch butterfly and its migration. A proposal to plant milkweed along its migratory route was issued, as milkweed has been disappearing over the past decade in America.

Snowy owls invade ‘south’; cold affects waterfowl (Associated Press): This winter has shown an invasion of snowy owls in 25 states. More than 2,500 snowy owls were reported in the U.S. and Canada this winter. The frigid cold is also causing unusual movements of waterfowl.  Due to the Great Lakes being almost entirely frozen over, some species of waterfowl are moving closer inland where they are not usually found.

 

Asian Carp plan, river tracing, butterflies and a gulf leak: this week in environmental news

By Allison Raeck, MNA Intern

Every Friday, MNA shares recent environmental news stories from around the state and country. Here’s some of what happened this week in environmental and nature news:

Image

Electrofishing for the invasive Asian carp.
Photo courtesy of Wikimedia Commons.

Feds update plan to protect Great Lakes from carp (ABC News): Improving defensive barriers is the primary focus of the $50 million federal plan to keep Asian carp from reaching the Great Lakes. The plan calls for reinforcement of electrical barriers already in place as well as for some new methods to deter Asian carp, such as a shock-and-catch method known as electrofishing. Currently, an electric fish barrier in the Chicago Sanitary and Ship Canal is repelling most of the invasive fish from the Great Lakes. Various conservation groups are brainstorming possible methods to keep Asian carp out of the Great Lakes and protect its $7 billion fishing industry.

Here’s a cool new tool for tracing US rivers to their sources and destinations (MinnPost): The National Atlas of the United States has developed a useful online map to trace U.S. rivers. Users can zoom into any area on the United States map or use the search feature to find the rivers they want to track. Once a river is selected, users can “Trace Upstream” to see sources draining to it or “Trace Downstream” to discover its destination. Additionally, the “Trace Report” button displays summaries and up-to-date detailed reports on any river, maintained by the U.S. Geological Survey.

Image

A monarch butterfly.
Photo courtesy of Wikimedia Commons.

Flowers are blooming, but where are Southwest Michigan’s butterflies? (mlive): Almost three months later than usual, monarch butterflies have recently been reported in the upper Midwest and southern Ontario area for the 2013 season. Monarchs are not the only butterflies seeing a dramatic decrease in Michigan, as rare Karner blues are more sparse than usual as well. Experts believe that the overall population decrease is a result of last year’s hot and dry weather as well as the lack of nectar-supplying plants this year. Additionally, human activities such as habitat destruction and pesticide use are likely causes of this butterfly population decline.

Carbon acidification could cause problems for Great Lakes wildlife (The Arenac County Independent): The Environmental Protection Agency is suggesting that carbon dioxide in the atmosphere could be affecting Great Lakes pH levels and harming lake wildlife. Though data on the issue is currently limited, experts believe that the increasingly acidic concentrations of Great Lakes waters are a result of human carbon emissions. Lowered pH levels in the lakes can also see lowered carbonate ion levels, hindering the formation of mussel and oyster shells. Though experts are not certain as to whether atmospheric carbon is the main cause for these acidic waters, the correlation has been proven in some oceanic areas.

Data Watch: The Great Lakes’ top priorities (Great Lakes Echo): Recent data shows that almost a third of the Environmental Protection Agency’s priority waste sites are in Great Lakes States. The agency’s National Priority List includes 1,320 areas that have released or can release hazardous contaminants. Each site is given a score on a scale from 0-100 based on environmental threat, with the average score of a Great Lakes region site being 41.77. All of the sites listed are either undergoing or awaiting cleanup.

Why The Latest Gulf Leak Is No BP Disaster (NPR): A natural gas well in the Gulf of Mexico exploded and caught fire Tuesday, resulting in a continual blaze off the Louisiana coast. Teams of workers are on the scene, putting out fire and cleaning up the mess. A thin sheen on the ocean surface has been reported in certain areas, caused by hydrocarbon liquids that were released into the air. While this explosion is having a negative environmental impact on the coast, experts say this leak is very different from the BP oil disaster of 2010. Bureau officials have not yet determined how the gas leak started or where it is located.