Field Experience at Dauner Martin Nature Sanctuary

Two enthusiastic interns and a grant from the Franklin D. Adams Fund of the Community Foundation of Greater Flint made a big difference this summer for one of MNA’s most popular nature sanctuaries, the Dauner Martin Nature Sanctuary in Fenton.

Andrew Borin recounts his summer internship experience:

Our time with MNA has proved to be a positive experience for both Ashlie and I. Neither of us could have imagined the positive reactions that we received from the volunteers, MNA staff and community members who recognized the work we accomplished in our time at Dauner Martin Nature Sanctuary. Ashlie and I came from different academic backgrounds but shared one common goal during the internship: to work hard and make the largest impact we could. Every day we gave our all and pushed through the never-ending wall of invasive shrubs that plagues the sanctuary. The most common of which was autumn olive. Dauner Martin was our home for the summer and offered many challenges.

Dauner Martin - Andrew BaconWhat Dauner Martin Nature Sanctuary lacks in rare species, it makes up for in the role it plays within the community. The sanctuary sits within a business district in Fenton, Michigan. This urban setting makes it a unique sanctuary for Michigan Nature Association and offers benefits and problems not found within their other properties. With two entrances into the sanctuary located close to a busy road, the roughly 4.5 miles of trails are frequented by Fenton’s local citizens. Having a 155-acre green space in a city offers many positives ecologically and for the community. Not only do visitors get to hike and enjoy the pine plantations, prairies, wetlands and hardwood forests offered by the sanctuary, it is also used by local organizations to help promote outdoor activities and an appreciation for nature. On the ecological side of things, the sanctuary also acts as a haven for an assortment of wildlife and promotes ground water recharge.

native plant garden - Andrew BorinOur common workday included a variety of activities. Trash clean up and trail maintenance was usually reserved for our down-time. We also installed a 1,700 square foot native garden which we hope will grow and flourish. But the majority of our time was spent cutting down invasive shrubs using power tools and treating the stumps with herbicide. After the shrubs were cut, we would haul the branches through the understory and stack them into piles. Overall we cleared over 10 acres performing these day-to-day activities.

Ashlie and Andrew at DMWith the internship completed, Ashlie and I are headed back to school to finish our final two semesters before entering the workforce. I will be finishing my degree in Plant Biology at Michigan State University with the intention of working in habitat conservation and restoration. Ashlie intends to work with fisheries in the Upper Peninsula after completing her degree in Fisheries and Wildlife at the University of Michigan. As we look towards our futures, I speak for both of us when I say that we will always look back at our time at Dauner Martin fondly and I’m sure we’ll be back to see what improvements have been made to the sanctuary. We can’t thank MNA enough for giving us this experience and will use what we have learned as a platform, upon which we will build our future careers.

Thank you Andrew and Ashlie for all of your hard work!

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Give to Michigan Species this Holiday Season!

Give to Michigan Species Image

This holiday season why not Give to Turtles or other special animals found in Michigan? You can show your support with a $10 gift to the Michigan Nature Association. In return, we’ll send you a certificate identifying the holder (add your name or someone on your gift list) as a proud sponsor of Michigan nature. The certificate, 8 ½” by 11” and suitable for framing, includes a photo of an important animal found in Michigan and is accompanied by a fact sheet with great information about that species.

Order online for the holidays by December 18 at http://michigannature.iescentral.com/donations/Give-to-Michigan-Animals or pay by mail and send in this order form. Choose the animal(s) you would like on the order form or let us choose for you. Order forms can be mailed to the MNA office or emailed to Jess at jfoxen@michigannature.org.

Makes a great stocking stuffer for kids, grandkids, and nature lovers of all ages! Proceeds support MNA’s mission to protect rare, threatened and endangered species in Michigan.

Animals to choose from:

Karner blue butterfly
Karner Blue Butterfly


Monarch Butterfly

Box Turtle
Eastern Box Turtle

moose
Moose

lake sturgeon
Lake Sturgeon

rattlesnake
Eastern Massasauga Rattlesnake

2017 Photo Contest Winners Announced!

Congratulations to our 2017 Photo Contest winners! Thank you to everyone that submitted a photo – we had many great options to choose from! Photos were submitted in three categories: Flora & Fauna, Landscapes, and People in Nature in order to capture Michigan’s natural beauty.

Grand Prize Winner!
“Lower Tahquamenon Falls” by Deb Traxinger

Overall Winner - Traxinger, Deb - Lower Tahquamenon Falls

Flora & Fauna

First Place:
“Singing Swallows” by Margaret Weber

Second Place:
“Redbud Romance” by Dustyn Blindert

Third Place:
“Karner Blue Butterfly” at MNA’s Karner Blue Nature Sanctuary in Newaygo County by Randy Butters

Honorable Mention:
“Flower & Fungi” at MNA’s Trillium Ravine Nature Sanctuary in Berrien County by Ellen Stevens

Landscapes

First Place:
“Huron” by Nathan Miller

Second Place:
“Lost Lake” by Ellen Wexler

Third Place:
“Sunrise at Seney” by Todd Maertz

Honorable Mention:
“Fairyland Meadow” by Virginia McClellan

People in Nature

First Place:
“5 Star Cuisine” by Alex Maier

Second Place:
“Pictured Rocks Kayakers” by Tom Ala

Third Place:
“Best Friends” by Ellen Wexler

Honorable Mention:
“Exploring with Pop” by Susan Cobb

What’s the Scoop with Michigan’s Soil?

By Michelle Ferrell, MNA Intern

Though not always the most celebrated components of a landscape, soils are certainly one of the most important. While plants form the basis of habitats, soils are central in determining which plants can grow where. Consequently, the soil/s of an ecosystem can drastically affect wildlife communities. Soils also play a critical role in filtering fresh water, and have served as the very foundations of civilization. How much do you know about the marvel beneath your feet?

kalkaska sand

Kalkaska sand. Photo: Randall Schaetzl.

In 1990, Michigan declared Kalkaska sand as its official state soil. It’s relatively infertile owing to its acidic nature, but nonetheless abundant. Despite being one of over 500 soils present in Michigan, Kalkaska sand, so named for one of the 29 counties in which it is present, covers nearly 5% of the state. It can be found in the upper half of the lower peninsula, as well as most of the upper peninsula; but just how did it get there?

The movement of glaciers shaped Michigan’s soils over the course of hundreds of thousands of years into what is known as glacial till. Read more about the process here. In the time since, our soils have undergone many changes to provide support for forests, wetlands, prairies, dunes, swamps, and human agriculture alike. In fact, if not for Kalkaska sand, the coniferous forests of northern Michigan may not exist.

Many of the evergreens that grow in our northern forests, including our ever-important state tree (white pine), are adapted to highly acidic, dry, and nutrient-poor conditions. As such, they rely on otherwise infertile soils like Kalkaska sand. The rare Kirtland’s warbler breeds exclusively in jack pine, and many other well-known species depend upon plant communities derived from Kalkaska sand. In a very real way, we have this unique soil to thank for the natural landscape as we know it today.

kirtlands warbler - cindy mead

Kirtland’s warbler in a jack pine forest. Photo: Cindy Mead.

Recognizing Outstanding Volunteers in 2017

 

Cover photo

2017 Volunteer & Donor Recognition Dinner

Thank you for joining MNA as we recognized the donors and volunteers who make our
continued success possible! The 2017 Volunteer & Donor Recognition Dinner
honored those who dedicate countless hours to MNA and reflected on another year of success.

The night was filled with entertainment, including a special silent auction to benefit
MNA’s Environmental Education Fund and a live performance by Lansing’s soul-blues master, Root Doctor!

   

Award Recipients

During the ceremony, MNA honored the following individuals for their
commitment to protecting Michigan’s natural heritage:

Richard W. Holzman Award:
Margaret Welsch

Frederick W. Case, Jr. Environmental Educator of the Year Award:
Deb Iwema

Mason and Melvin Schafer Distinguished Service Award:
Bill Atkinson

Volunteer of the Year Award:
Dan Burton
Brett Harris
Bill Houston
Phil Quenzi

Good Neighbor Award:
Valerie and John Vance
Clay DeGayner

Also a special congratulations to our 2017 Photo Contest winners,
Race for Michigan Nature 5K runners, and Eagle Scouts!

Like, share, and tag yourself in the photos from the dinner on our Facebook page!

We appreciate all you do for MNA’s mission and we hope to see you again next year!

Fall Into Fun With MNA

By Michelle Ferrell, MNA Intern

The fall season is alive and vibrant, and you should be, too! Though it brings with it shorter days and cooler weather, there are still plenty of ways to enjoy the colorful outdoors and connect with nature. Join in on a guided fall color hike this coming Saturday, October 14 at Phillips Family Memorial, known for being just 1 of 3 MNA sanctuaries that protect a coastal plain marsh!

For the more leisurely hiker, birding enthusiast, individual or family just wanting to enjoy the offerings of nature at her most colorful, MNA owns a number of sanctuaries suited to a variety of interests. Check out a few of our most scenic fall favorites:

Gratiot Lake Overlook Nature Sanctuary

Lookout, Grat. Lk. - Charlie Eshbach

Near the town of Central, Gratiot Lake will make sure you are in shape if you want the best view. The new trail rises nearly 400 feet to an overlook of Gratiot Lake a quarter mile to the south.

A gushing waterfall can be found on Eister Creek by following the creek towards the lake. Please be careful, the journey can be steep and slippery.

Lefglen Nature Sanctuary

Marianne Glosenger - Lefglen (2)Lefglen has a variety of plant communities, including wooded uplands, oak barrens, cattail marsh, and prairie fen. More than 50 species of birds nest here, and Lefglen’s beautiful Lake Nirvana is completely surrounded by wetlands where sandhill cranes have been known to nest. Migratory birds such as blue-winged teal and Great egrets also stop over on their journeys.

Barvick’s Sand Dunes Nature SanctuaryBarvick's

A scenic trail loops through Barvick’s Sand Dunes, a sanctuary which consists of a 40 acre dune and forest complex containing a coastal plain marsh and hardwood conifer swamp. Rogers Creek crosses through the northeast corner of the sanctuary. The 40 acres are bounded by CR 376 (44th Ave) to the north and Becht Road (80th St) to the east.

Wade Memorial Nature Sanctuary

Wade memorialLocated three miles east of Saugatuck on the eastern end of Silver Lake, the Wade Memorial contains a lovely beech-maple forest as well as numerous dogwood and hemlock trees on a high bluff overlooking the lake. It is a fine example of a beech-maple forest with hemlocks that have grown back after a wildfire that occurred in the early 1900’s.

Silver Lake abuts the southwestern portion of the sanctuary and a canoe or kayak can be launched here for a pleasant trip amidst beds of pickerel weed and other aquatic plants.

Twin Waterfalls Nature Sanctuary

Twin Waterfalls - Olson Falls 2 - Mike ZajczenkoAptly named, as a half-mile of trails lead visitors to the beautiful Memorial Falls and Olson Falls. The vertical walls of both waterfall canyons are part of the Munising Formation, which consists of ancient buff, rose-colored sandstone about 550 million years old. Each season offers something unique at Twin Waterfalls!

Kernan Memorial Nature Sanctuary

KernanThe rocky shallow harbor at Kernan Memorial Sanctuary discourages any nearshore boat activity, making this secluded area excellent for bird watching. Several species of gulls and ducks call the sanctuary home. November and early March are the best time to see migratory birds, while spotting shore birds such as black-bellied plovers and sanderlings is best in September and October.

Members of the public are always welcome to visit and volunteer, no matter their experience level. Check the MNA events calendar for additional upcoming workdays and events. For more information on MNA sanctuaries, upcoming activities, or other ways to get involved, contact the MNA office at (866) 223-2231.

Species Spotlight: Lake Sturgeon

By Michelle Ferrell, MNA Intern

lake sturgeon

Though Lake Sturgeon make look intimidating with their armored, angular bodies, it may be fair to classify them as gentle giants of the Great Lakes. They have lived in this region for around 10,000 years – and have existed for around 136 million. Capable of living for 150 years or longer, these ancient freshwater behemoths are the longest-lived of Michigan’s fish species, as well as the largest, having been known to reach lengths of 8 feet and weigh several hundred pounds. It may technically be female sturgeon which are the longest-lived Great Lakes fish, though, as they can outlive males by as much as a century!

Sturgeon are cartilaginous (non-bony) fish with torpedo-shaped bodies. Instead of scales, they have a kind of armor in the form of bony scutes that cover their bodies. Juveniles may be gray or brown, and appear more angular, while adults tend to be lighter in color and may be gray or olive. The growth rates of Sturgeon are highly variable, but cleaner, more temperate waters and greater food availability offer ideal conditions for these fish to grow large.

Sexual maturity in males is reached anywhere from 8 to 22 years for males and 14 to 26 years for females. Spawning occurs in early spring, usually from April to June, when water temperatures warm to 53-64° F in clean, shallow waters and fast-moving stream rapids. Though they accomplish this impressive feat on average only once every 6-7 years, females lay millions of eggs when spawning – that’s an average of 5,500 eggs per pound of fish!

Once, the range of lake sturgeon extended from parts of Canada down to Alabama, and populations in the Great Lakes region were estimated to have numbered in the millions. However, only remnant populations remain. Historic overfishing in the 19th and 20th centuries nearly led to the extinction of lake sturgeon, as well as pollution and habitat loss from dams and deforestation. They are now listed as Endangered, Threatened, or Special Concern in all but one of the states throughout their range.

Thankfully, Michigan sponsors efforts to protect sturgeon and restore parts of their habitat. Their spawning period is an especially crucial one, as their preferences for shallow waters make them vulnerable. If you happen to come across sturgeon in the wild, count yourself fortunate to have witnessed these living fossils. Learn more about this iconic Great Lakes species from the DNR website.

Join MNA on Sunday, October 8 for our annual Sturgeon Sprint Family Fun Run & 5K in Detroit! Run along the scenic roadway of Belle Isle State Park. The fee for adults is $25, and $10 for kids. As always, a t-shirt is included and all runners receive a participatory medal! Proceeds will promote efforts to protect the Lake Sturgeon. Register online or contact Jess Foxen at jfoxen@michigannature.org for more information.

A pre-party will be held at Blaze Pizza, located at 3129 Fairlane Drive, Allen Park, from 3-7 pm. Present this flyer with your fast-fire’d creation and Blaze will donate 20% of their proceeds to MNA! Happy running!

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