CISMAs, Migratory Bird Treaty, and Sea Lampreys: this week in environmental news

Collaboration key to stopping spread of invasive species across southeast Michigan (Metromode): Cooperative Invasive Species Management Areas (CISMAs) are a new model of collaborative management unfolding across the state. They are designed to get people working together to address the threats posed by invasive species. The Michigan Nature Association is a partner to both the Oakland County CISMA and the St. Clair CISMA in southeast Michigan and MNA is included in both funded grants. The two CISMAs will work with the Stewardship Council and each other to mobilize new areas for collaboration and care for their shared land and water. Their ultimate goal: bringing people together.

Migratory Bird Treaty Centennial 1916-2016 (U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service): The Migratory Bird Treaty and Act is commemorating its Centennial this year. These efforts have helped manage and conserve millions of acres of wildlife habitat benefiting migratory birds. Congress passed the Migratory Bird Act in 1918 to formally implement the provisions of the 1916 Treaty. Specifically, the Act prohibited the hunting, killing, capturing, possession, sale, transportation, and exportation of birds, feathers, eggs, and nests. It also provided for the establishment of protected refuges to give birds safe habitats and it encouraged sharing of data between nations to monitor bird populations.

migratory bird treaty

Odes to the Great Lakes: GVSU exhibition showcases collaborative pieces (Great Lakes Echo): Two department chairs at Grand Valley State University have curated an exhibition with collaborative works that showcase the Great Lakes region.  The exhibit is called Great Lakes: Image & Word, which is now open until April 1 at the GVSU Performing Arts Center.

sea lamprey

Sea lamprey mouth. Photo: T. Lawrence, Great Lakes Fishery Commission

Siren song for lamprey closer to Great Lakes use (Great Lakes Echo): Sea lampreys are one of the most costly and destructive invaders in the Great Lakes region. But new understandings of the functions and behaviors of these animals has given researchers a new way to try to combat this invasion, including the first vertebrate biopesticide ever discovered. The biopesticide is registered as a lamprey pheromone – a pheromone is an odor that is intentionally released as the purpose of communicating with another individual. It could take several more years of research to make sure the biopesticide does not have unintended consequences and is ready for use. But registration gives the compound the legal foundation needed for eventual mass production.

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