Sleeping Bear Dunes, gray wolves, and invasive species: this week in environmental news

sleeping bear dunes

Sleeping Bear Dunes

Living Lab: Science a constant at Sleeping Bear Dunes National Lakeshore (Record-Eagle): More than 30 scientific studies take place within the park at any given time. Some studies include topics such as tree generation, tree disease, and the impact of deer on vegetation. The public is able to learn about the studies taking place by attending Research Rendezvous talks, which are presented by scientists themselves. The talks are free and take place at Sleeping Bear’s Philip A. Hart Visitor Center in Empire.

Nature-inspired art exhibit opens Saturday at U-M (Detroit Free Press): The art exhibit “Forest & Tree – a Multitude of Gifts”, featuring nature-inspired works, is opening this weekend at the University of Michigan’s Matthaei Botanical Gardens. The exhibit, displaying works from nearly 70 artists, runs through January 3.

Scientists call for continuing Great Lakes wolf protections (Upper Michigans Source): Gray wolves in the western Great Lakes region should not yet be removed from the federal endangered species list, a group of scientists and scholars say, disagreeing with colleagues who said the population has rebounded sufficiently. The scientists contend the wolves still meet the legal definition of endangered species and need to continue to follow state management plans.

wolf

Scientists say gray wolves should remain on the endangered species list.

New invasive species discovered in Michigan rivers (The Arenac County Independent): The Department of Natural Resources has confirmed that two new aquatic invasive species have been detected in Michigan. Rock snot and the New Zealand mud snail have only been found in one river each.

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