Deer penalties, osprey nests and gypsy moth removal: this week in environmental news

By Alyssa Kobylarek, MNA intern

Every Friday, MNA gathers news stories related to conservation and the environment from around the state and country. Here is some of what happened this week in environmental news:

New state law stiffens penalties for poaching deer, especially bucks with trophy-sized racks (mlive): A new state law designed to deter poaching deer is in effect in Michigan. The new law makes changes to the fines and restitution payments for poaching deer. This law should help curb poaching in Jackson County where big bucks are known to be present.

Gypsy moths defoliate trees and impact Ohio's timber industry. Photo courtesy of WIkimedia Commons

Gypsy moths defoliate trees and impact Ohio’s timber industry. Photo courtesy of Wikimedia Commons

Ohio’s Department of Agriculture to treat Gypsy Moth (Great Lakes Echo): Parts of Ohio will be treated to slow the spread of the gypsy moth in early spring. Fifty-one counties are under gypsy moth quarantine due to the attacks on more than 300 types of trees and shrubs. Gypsy moths have a negative impact on Ohio’s forestry and defoliate trees. The two approaches to suppress the population are mating distribution and the use of BT, which is a bacterium used to control moth caterpillars.

President Obama signs Sleeping Bear Dunes wilderness legislation into law (mlive): On Thursday, President Obama signed the bill to designate 32,557 acres of Sleeping Bear Dunes National Lakeshore as wilderness under the National Wilderness Preservation System. This is the first wilderness protection bill to pass both chambers since 2009, and is the result of years of planning.

Joseph Sax, Who Pioneered Environmental Law, Dies at 78 (The New York Times): Joseph Sax, who helped shape environmental law in the United States and fueled the environmental movement, died Sunday in California. He emerged in 1970 as one of the most prominent of a new breed of lawyers focusing exclusively on the environment. He wrote Michigan’s environmental act, which became law in 1970 and was used in nearly 300 federal and state decisions between 1997 and 2008.

Ospreys often make their nests on cellular and utility towers which obstruct access. Photo courtesy of Wikimedia Commons

Ospreys often make their nests on cellular and utility towers which obstruct access. Photo courtesy of Wikimedia Commons

Experts warn against osprey nest removal (Great Lakes Echo): Osprey nest in tall objects and commonly are found in cellular and utility towers. But the nests obstruct access to the towers and lines and utility workers often move them so they can work. Osprey, though, use the same nests for up to 10 years. Protection for the birds is lenient and if there are no birds or eggs in the nest, it is legal to remove it, but companies are doing what they can to help protect them.

 

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