Help MNA Preserve Our Sanctuaries

It is very important to address invasive species like garlic mustard in our sanctuaries.

Garlic Mustard at Rizor Nature Sanctuary. Photo by Natalie Kent- Norkowski

Garlic Mustard at Rizor Nature Sanctuary. Photo by Natalie Kent- Norkowski

Garlic Mustard is a native plant of Europe and many people believe it was introduced to the United States as a cooking herb. Once it is introduced into a habitat it spreads rapidly because of the large amount of seeds it releases and its tolerance of low-light areas.

Garlic Mustard takes resources like soil nutrients and water away from native plants, making it very difficult for native species to survive. New research has revealed a compound released by Garlic Mustard root systems which depresses the growth of native grasses and tree seedlings, even further explaining its dominance in forest ecosystems.

MNA leads volunteer trips to our sanctuaries to pull this invasive species out of the ground and take it out of the habitat so that it cannot spread its seeds. If you would like to find out more about how you can help with these projects, or any other volunteer opportunities please visit http://www.michigannature.org/home/how_help/calendar.shtml.

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About Michigan Nature Association

The Michigan Nature Association is a non-profit organization that has been dedicated to preserving Michigan’s natural heritage since 1952. MNA protects more than 10,000 acres of land in over 170 nature sanctuaries throughout the state of Michigan, from the tip of Keweenaw in the Upper Peninsula to the Indiana/Ohio border.